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Torah Thoughts: Yom Hashoah 5778

B”H Torah Thoughts: Yom Hashoah 5778 Rabbi Rami Pavolotzky   This week we are commemorating Holocaust Remembrance Day, or, as we say in Hebrew, Yom Hashoah Vehagvura. We remember the six million of our brothers and sisters who were killed by the Nazis and their partners in crime, during the dark years of 1939-1945. We tend to use the terms “Holocaust” and “Shoah” indistinctly, to refer to the sum of

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Shabbat – Pesach 5778

B”H Shabbat – Pesach 5778 Rabbi Daniela “The Song at the Sea” and the power of communal singing” The Torah reading for the seventh day of Passover (Exodus 13:17-15:26), which we are going to read this Friday morning, consists of the description of the miracle of the splitting of the Red Sea, the crossing of the Red Sea by the Jews, and the song “Shirat Hayam,” “The Song at the

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Tora Thoughts: Pesach Eve 5778

B”H Tora Thoughts: Pesach Eve 5778 Rabbi Rami Pavolotzky   Why Do We Wish One Another a Kosher and Happy Holiday on Passover? We are almost ready for Passover! We have been cleaning, kashering, shopping, cooking.… Let the holiday begin! One thing we should definitely know is how to greet another person on this occasion. Let’s see! Of course, you can always say Happy Passover/Pesach, or the more usual Chag

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Torah Thoughts- Parashat Tzav – Shabbat Hagadol 5778

B”H Parashat Tzav – Shabbat Hagadol 5778 Rabbi Daniela Why is this Shabbat called “Shabbat Hagadol” (“The Great Shabbat”)? This Shabbat, which precedes the festival of Pesach (Passover), is called “Shabbat Hagadol,” “The Great Shabbat.” Why does this Shabbat have this special name? There are many explanations. One of them is that the Haftarah (Malachi 3:4-24), the prophetic portion, we read this Shabbat speaks of the “great day” of God

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BPES is pleased to present “Let the People Sing: Congregational Singing in the American Conservative Synagogue, in the early to mid-20th Century”

Congregational singing was an innovation, spearheaded by the Conservative Movement. Rabbi Goldberg will discuss the social, religious, and cultural factors that encouraged this development, the protagonists and resisters, the creation of a corpus of melodies that became “standard” throughout the Conservative Movement, culminating in the publication of the Zamru Lo by the Cantors Assembly in the 1950s and 1960s.

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